Private Charles BYRNE was awarded a silver Victoria Cross whilst he was in Netley convalescing in 1855 after fighting in an attack on the Redan.

Gunner James Thomas COPESTAKE

Derby Daily Telegraph 2nd April 1924

Philip Henry CURTIS was injured in January 1900 and taken to the hospital in Ladysmith. He arrives at Netley on June 20th suffering from 2 wounds from Mauser bullets. After a few medical reports, he is discharged in November 1900 and awarded a pension for life of 1 shilling a day. His brother William George was at Netley in WWI (see Passing Through - In WWI tab)

From the Curtis family tree on Ancestry.

 

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Pte. FALLA Sydney Evening News 26th December 1901
Fred Foster Hartlepool Mail 7th May 1952

Charles Walter GRAY

Hi there. My great great grandfather was Charles Walter Gray, born in Maidstone in 1873. He was in the 7th Queen's Own Hussars. On the 16th of July 1897 he was wounded in Mashonaland which is in modern day Zimbabwe. He had to have his leg amputated after receiving the wound from an enemy spear. He recovered at Netley Military Hospital. The photo of him here is at Netley, he is on the left with the crutches. Thanks. Russell

From Russell Masters on the RVCP Netley Hospital Heritage Group facebook page

Robert Frith HARLOW

Derby Evening Telegraph December 24th 1935

Walter Harry LAWRENCE

The Sunday Post August 1st 1948

Harry ROGERS

The Leeds Times June 1900

Sgt. Stanley SHORE

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Mercury October 12th 1953

Enoch WADLEY was born in 1861 in Herefordshire. At the age of 17 he enlisted in the 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment and was sent to India. During the next nine years, he saw a lot of fighting and in January1887, he was taken to hospital in India and declared insane by the army surgeon K.M. O'Callighan. In March he was sent to Netley with a certificate saying that he was of an unsound mind and he had been eccentric for months. Dr Welsh of Netley hospital said he could not return to the service because he had been  "affected with insanity", so he was discharged and sent home on the 7th June 1887.

 

On the 15th June 1887 he killed Elizabeth Hannah Evans after meeting her from her work in the barleyfields, and after a trial, was found guilty and sentenced to death.

 

From Anthony Cope on Ancestry.

 

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C.P.O. WILLIS Portsmouth Evening News 10th November 1931
The "Netley" invalid tricycle
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